Bo Innovation | Hong Kong | Jul ’14

14 Feb
  • Rating: 16/20
  • Address: 60 Johnston Road, Hong Kong
  • Phone: +852 2850 8371
  • Price: HKD2,400 (310 USD at 1 USD = 7.76HKD)
  • Value: 2/5
  • Chef: Alvin Leung

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My meal at Bo Innovation featured touches of Hong Kong, Korea, and Southeast Asia. Alvin Leung shuns the “molecular” tag, and his type of innovation involves bringing the East Asian flavors and remixing it with classic preparations like baked alaska, hollandaise. For your main, you are dine on beef, but it is paired with oxtongue cooked in bak-kut-teh spices and coated with chocolate.

The three highlights: I found myself impressed by Chef Leung’s re-imaginings: the Lap Mei Fan baked alaska, which featured a sensational Chinese-sausage ice cream, a jar of spam puree with black truffle, a bak kut teh oxtongue. (these three dishes, the best, were only available in the extended tasting menu – which means that diners ordering a shorter menu might find Bo Innovation disappointing).

The others dishes generally lacked a foundation: Outside of one or dishes, like the lap mei fan baked alaska, or the bak kut teh oxtongue, I didn’t find the cooking at Bo Innovation very compelling. Most of the other dishes had multiple ingredients that didn’t make sense on that plate, as if the kitchen had to show off how avant garde it was, without considering whether the ingredients were harmonious or not. Multiple dishes didn’t have a compelling backbone to build on: for example it was hard to see what were the supporting ingredients in the MULHOE, RED FISH and BLUE LOBSTER, as well as the COCONUT dessert. Every component shouted on the palate. The result was often not in harmony. At 3 very good dishes, the hit-miss ratio was a bit low for me as well.

The HK food blogger g4gary has an intelligent observation: “As for the endless debate of whether the 3-star bestowed upon the place is justified, while I agree this is perhaps the most atypical 3-starred restaurant I have set foot in, if you took the literal definition of Michelin 3-stars meaning restaurants serving exceptional cuisine that [is] worth a special journey, I could see why Bo Innovation would make the grade. Strange as it sounds, his food is uniquely Hong Kong – it wouldn’t have made much sense to serve the same food anywhere else in the world – so from that perspective, the meal itself does worth a special journey for some adventurous minds. Guess I would leave it at that.

Don’t take it literally: I think this is probably what went through the Michelin inspectors’ minds when they awarded Bo Innovation 3-stars. In terms of refinement and objective enjoyment, this is probably a restaurant that merits 1-star. But the literal interpretation of 3-stars as “exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey” opens a can of worms. Lesser chefs who hop onto the “innovation” bandwagon to create an endless array of average but novel dishes are rewarded, and chefs who focus on perfecting their dishes are penalized. I think the Michelin brand has stood the test of time because of the accumulated wisdom about what a 1-star, 2-star, and 3-star restaurant means in terms of excellence, and not because of its literal rubric of “journey-worthiness”. The recent rush to star “innovative” restaurants strikes me as a half-baked attempt to compete with the San Pellegrino guide.

Other links

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  • Waffle/ onion/ ham  (3.75/5)
    • Street food. Flour, fried. Tastes of onion

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  • CAVIAR: smoked quail egg, taro nest (4.25/5)
    • Presented on a silver tree to emphasise the “nest”. Enjoyable.
    • The quail egg was hard,

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  • MULHOE: foie gras, spicy korean miso, pear, sea urchin, sea bladder, smoked squid, sea bream, jicama (4.25/5)
    • Squeezing foie and spicy miso out a tube, the ingredients in a sweet cold pear consomme
    • Korean-influenced dish. Perhaps the restaurant is vying to be a pan-Asian culinary champion?

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  • LAP MEI FAN: baked alaska, “lap cheong” (5/5)
    • Hot-cold contrast, a crowd pleaser with the strong tastes of alcohol. Highly visual dish, setting the alcohol on fire
    • The sweetness of Chinese sausage was a revelation, used in a a smooth icecream that contrasted well with texture of puffed rice underneath.

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  • UMAMI: black truffle, toro, har mi oil, vermicelli, rice noodle (3.75/5)
    • The spongey tuna belly toro was a bit sour.
    • The given explanation for the existence of this dish was that each of the ingredients had strong umami components. As a dish however, it failed to be more than the sum of its ingredients – though the ingredients were strong.
    • The most overwhelming part of the dish was the har mi (dried shrimp) on the vermicelli, which dominated the toro and truffle.

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  • MOLECULAR: “xiao long bao” (3.75/5)
    • A Bo Innovation signature, this xiaolongbao featured ginger with a spherified meat broth. Not bad.

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  • BABY FOOD: black truffle “chian dan chee” (4.5/5)
    • Audaciously remixing high and low gastronomy – variety meats in the form of spam foam, mixed with yolk and crispy bits of ham, and truffle foam.
    • It tasted good, but to me it felt like a cheap trick. Spam has already been engineered to appeal to our fat and salt craving brains, it would not take much for a chef to make spam delicious.

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  • RED FISH: yunnan ham, dry mandarin peel, wild mushroom, jerusalem artichoke, pickled pearl onion (3.75/5)
    • Yunnan ham sauce, yellow foot mushroom,
    • The sunchoke (or jerusalem artichoke) was just a block of sweet starch, which could have been reduced in portion, and the chips (mandarin peel?) had no taste

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  • BLUE LOBSTER: sichuan hollandaise, hot shaohsing broth, chinese leek dumpling, charred corn
    • lobster bisque, shaoxing wine, a slight bitter aftertaste. hollandaise with sichuan peppercorn
    • 3.75/5

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  • MAO TAI: calamansi
    • when you’re drunk, you can go with the flow and Epicurean feeling (3.5/5)

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  • SWEETBREAD: oyster sauces, mountain yam, spring onion, ginger
    • Not bad sweetbreads, braised in oyster sauce. (4/5)

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  • SAGA-GYU BEEF: striploin, bakkutteh chocolate ox tongue, truffled taro, spring onion (4.5/5)
    • the beef was A3 saga-gyu, North Kyushu. I found the most unique part of this dish the bak-kut-teh ox tongue coated in choclate sauce. A liverish texture for the tongue, soft and pliant, with an interesting thick chocolate paste coating it.
    • The bak kut teh flavor was mild, and imparting a herbal flavor to the oxtongue. Not a dish I crave, but when reflecting on my meal 6 months later it is one of the two things I remember

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  • ALMOND: genmai, okinawa black sugar, cinnamon (3.5/5)
    • spherified almond milk (outer texture like a Chinese “tangyuan” dessert dumpling, inside texture of tofu), genmai tea flavored with black sugar and cinnamon.
    • the tea was overwhelmed with sugar

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  • COCONUT: palm sugar, coconut water, chocolate, pina colada, cherry, pandan
    • A curious combination. It is not quite chendol, with pandan cream and young coconut meringues.
    • It was a splatter of ingredients that evoked Southeast Asia – palm sugar, water, pandan (and an interesting touch of dried wolfsberries in the soil), but did not come together very well
    • (4/5) – the individual ingredients were nice.

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  • Petit fours (based off 8 treasures tea)
    • generally around 4/5
    • longan (lit: dragon eye), coconut jelly
    • osmanthus steamed sponge cake
    • rose macaron, lychee, butter cream
    • lotus seed, custard, sticky rice dumpling
    • mandarin peel chocolate truffle
    • red date marshmallow
    • wolfberry, tianjin pear, crystal bun
    • chrysanthemum meringue

One Response to “Bo Innovation | Hong Kong | Jul ’14”

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  1. the world of food in 2014 (part 2): best dishes of 2014 | Kenneth Tiong eats - January 1, 2016

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